Hey Ping,

I've failed a lot of things in my short life span, and I know what it is to tell yourself or have others tell you that it’s not your fault and there was nothing you could do about it. Most people who tell you that though have no Idea what or how you are feeling and that it doesn't help for you to say that. I just finished watching "The Albertson Project: Old School, Same Goal" and I feel so bad for that man! Jimmy works so hard and gives it everything he has, but nothing ever goes his way. Three years ago I made a major career choice and with the support of my wife and family I went head first into that "job"(we'll just call it that) and put everything I had into becoming mentally, emotionally, and physically ready for it. To make a long story short, I failed. Everyone who knows my story has told me that it wasn't my fault and that I couldn't control the outcome, but I don't live one day without feeling the effects of that failure. I see that in Jimmy and hear it in his voice. You cannot be at the level he is and not feel the effects of the failure. It kills confidence, and when people say "success breeds success" they forget that it goes the other way too. I hate to see this happen to other people and I hope things change for Jimmy. One really good race would make a big difference, and I pray that it comes soon. Everyone can't succeed, but I think Jimmy is gonna shine soon! Telling him to keep his head up doesn't help that much, but those who know him really need to step in and say what they know will boost his confidence, and lift his spirit. Don't say "Why aren't you..." Instead, say "Man, you're looking good out there!! Keep pushing, you've got this!!"

Brady

Frankfort, IN (that snowy place where dirt bikes are in the shed for 6 months)

p.s. My motto this year is: "Failing is perfectly fine, as long as you get back up, figure out why you failed, and never do it again" - Chad Reed  

Looping out and Living the Dream. 
Looping out and Living the Dream. 

Brady,

I’m sorry to hear you’ve had a rough go of it lately; life can kick you in the nads like that sometimes. Chad Reed has been inspirational, especially this year, and he exemplifies the determination that it takes to be successful. But you also have to take a good look at the talents you have and make realistic goals. As a kid I loved football and I really wanted to be an NFL quarterback when I grew up. When was the last time you saw an NFL quarterback that was 5’ 7” and weighed 165lbs? That doesn’t happen; not even in Canadian League Football. So I found something else I was passionate about and good at and I moved forward. Now I’m not sure what it was you were trying to do and maybe it was just a bad stroke of luck that kept you from achieving it. But if you were really that close and you are capable of doing the job then try again. And again if you have to … And again …

As for Jimmy Albertson I don’t know why you feel so bad for him. Motocross is an incredibly difficult way to make a living and Jimmy seems to be doing okay. He may not be winning races but he has made it further than 99 percent of racers that try. This sport has been grinding guys up and spitting them out for years but the drama and disappointment is just more visible now with all the media outlets available. Keep cheering for Jimmy because he is one of the good guys.

And good luck getting that career started.

PING

 

Ping,

I'm a big Zach Osborne fan. My question is.... Do you think we can predict the severity of winters with the thickness of Zach’s eyebrows?

Just wondering,

Jamie

eyebrowsJamie,

I’m a big Zach Osborne fan as well. He is fast, aggressive and his work ethic is apparent by his outstanding physical fitness. And, yes, I believe the Polar Vortex was a directly tied to those two fabulous patches of luxurious, walnut brown hair above his eyes.

PING

 

Hey Ping,

I always appreciate your insight each week to the often ridiculous world of the Motocross Industry decision making.   I was just curious about your thoughts on if those who make the marketing decisions in the industry have a backup plan in case the Energy Drink companies go the way of Joe Camel and Coors Light.  I'm old enough to remember the transition from those company sponsors but not old enough to have cared. There is such an industry reliance on the sponsorship money from these companies that can be wiped out with the swipe of a pen from those who feel the need to protect us from ourselves. (I do get that there are those who need protection but that's a whole other topic that a guy named Darwin knows well.)  Who do you see as stepping up and filling this void? Will it be the large box stores, the automakers, insurance companies or maybe even the airlines? I know the Energy Drink industry is huge but I think that if the Motocross marketers adjust their target audience to those with maybe a bit more disposable income everyone in the industry can benefit. Anyway, keep up the good work. Thanks.

Mike Z
Brookfield, CT

Thank you, energy drink marketing geniuses. 
Thank you, energy drink marketing geniuses. 

Mike,

It’s scary to think how hard this sport would have to scale back if energy drink companies decided to take their ball and go play somewhere else. Supercross has changed title sponsors before and the product is good enough that if Monster wanted to get out I don’t think Feld would have to look far to find someone willing to step in. But there are many teams and riders who are largely funded by energy drink dollars and it would be a huge blow to those teams and their riders. Monster Energy/Kawasaki, Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki, Red Bull/KTM, Red Bull/Troy Lee Designs and Rockstar KTM would be hit hardest. Fortunately, for now, dirt bike racing and sugary, caffeinated drinks go together like Justin Bieber and bad decisions.

PING

Have a question for Ping? Email him at ping@racerxonline.com.